Redundancy Power

Redundancy Power

REDUNDANCY POWER

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WHY UPS?
Reasons for choosing an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS)

  • Power Failure is responsible for 28% of computer system breakdowns
  • Over one third of companies take more than a day to recover from the disruption caused by a power failure. 10% take more than a week
  • Because of a power failure, 33% of companies lose between £10 000 and £250 000, 20% lose between £250000 and £1 million, 15% lose over £1 million
  • Out of 450 leading companies surveyed, each suffered an average of 9 computer failures each year. (Source: Find FVP/Fortune 1000 companies)
  • Following a power failure it can take up to 48 hours to reconfigure a network system or a multi terminal
  • It can take days, weeks or even months to re-input lost data. Sometimes data is lost forever, for instance in CAD or graphics applications where original work can never be recreated

Ten consequences of computer breakdowns:

  • Loss of business
  • Backlog of work/loss of production
  • Deterioration of customer service
  • Loss of customer account management
  • Loss of financial Control
  • Loss of goodwill
  • Inability to pay staff
  • Financial Loss
  • Loss of operational data
  • Loss of customers
  • Loss of market share, damage to a company’s reputation, and loss of goodwill are not covered by insurance following a computer disaster
  • Insurance claims take a long time to settle – well after the disaster has occurred
  • 90% of all companies that experience a computer disaster and don’t have a survival plan go out of business within 18 months (Source: Price Waterhouse)

Uninterruptible Power Supply Technologies Explained

Offline, Online and Line-interactive
What’s the difference, and which technology is right for you? There a three different types of UPS all suitable for different tasks, and supporting different types of load. Here are explanations of the different technologies, which may help you decide which type of UPS is suitable for you:

Offline-Standby Technology
During normal operation, the power flows straight through the unit and hence only RFI filtering is usually provided. When the input voltage fails or fluctuates outside of a pre-set tolerance window, the UPS detects this and a relay will close, allowing the UPS to start feeding battery power via the inverter. The inverter is then switched on and either a square, step or sine waveform output is supplied. Upon the return of mains power, the output is switched back onto mains and the inverter is turned off. Typically there will be a break of between 4-10 ms during the transfer to and from the battery mode.

Line-Interactive Technology
A line-interactive UPS operates in a very similar fashion to an offline UPS, except with the advantage of better filtering and output voltage boost/reduce features. Whilst not eliminating mains-borne interference, line-interactive technologies reduce the impact of spikes, surges and sags by ‘clipping’ the peaks and valleys, boosting power or switching to battery back-up. As with offline UPS, when the input voltage fails or fluctuates outside of a pre-set tolerance window, the UPS detects this and a relay will close allowing the UPS to start feeding battery power via the inverter. The inverter, in a good line-interactive UPS, will supply a sinewave output. Upon the return of mains power, the output is switched back onto mains and the inverter is turned off. As with offline UPS, typically there will be a break on the transfer to and from battery mode, though usually this will be shorter than with an offline UPS.

Some manufacturers will try to pass their line-interactive UPS off as online models by calling them ‘digital online’, ‘inline’ or ‘online interactive’ – make sure you know what technology the UPS you are buying actually uses.

Online Double Conversion Technology
An uninterruptible power supply using true online double conversion technology provides the highest level of power protection available. The UPS converts the 230V input AC mains supply to DC power which is then used to charge the battery. The DC current flow is then fed through an inverter stage which reconstructs the 230V AC mains output. Because the AC output is completely regenerated, it will be completely free from any mains-borne interference such as spikes and voltage variations.

The output voltage and frequency is controlled precisely, thus ensuring a clean and stable sinewave power output. Online UPS are able to withstand large fluctuations on the input voltage before transferring to battery power (typically 276V-184V) thus eliminating unnecessary battery discharges. Upon mains failure, transfer to battery power is seamless – no break. Online UPS also have various failsafe and self-diagnostic features that will instantly transfer the load onto mains power if there is a failure within the UPS hardware, or if the UPS is overloaded.